Campine Chickens

Breed Rating (8 reviews)

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History

The Campine originated in Antwerp Belgium and has been bred for several centuries. They were bred for their white shelled eggs. The Campine was brought to the UK in the 19th Century. The Campine is very similar to the Belgium Braekal in all ways except size. The Braekal is the larger of the two. The English or standard Campine we now have today is a mix of two Belgium Varieties with the plumage of the Campine male and female being identical in colour patterns.

Behaviour

The breed is a lively one that prefers to be out and about free ranging most of the time. The birds are very alert and inquisitive. Some can be rather wild in nature whilst others can be very friendly.

Varieties

This bird has been bred in two different colours - Golden and silver. It is a beautiful bird with pencilling feathers. The golden Campine\'s body, wings and tail are black, barred with dark orange and gold. Their necks are a striking burnt orange colour. They do have pure white earlobes and their legs are slate blue. The Campine is a small tightly feathered bird. They are mainly bred for ornamental purposes but they will lay a fair number of medium white shelled eggs. They are a non-broody bird but are less cold hardy and their combs can be prone to frostbite.

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Latest Reviews For Campines (5 of 8)

  • 5 Star: 6 (6)
  • 4 Star: 2 (2)
  • 3 Star: 0 (0)
  • 2 Star: 0 (0)
  • 1 Star: 0 (0)
Average Rating:

           (Based on 8 reviews)

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           Independent and inquisitive

- Corinne, 19 September 2012

We only read the reviews on this site after we bought our golden campine hen to add to a new mixed flock ... and we began to worry about how we would cope with her, even though we have kept chickens for over 20 years! She started off at the bottom of the pecking order - no doubt partly due to most of the other birds being bigger than her - but she has amazing survival instincts. She is a smash and grab specialist and has no trouble stealing titbits from the beaks of other hens and dashing out of the way with her ill-gotten gains. Yes! she is independent and always the one to end up on the wrong side of the fence or where she shouldnt be! But she is also the friendliest of our hens (which are all hand-tame) and trots along at our heels talking away whenever we are out in our very large garden with the birds. This bird just oozes character but is definitely not a breed to be kept in a confined space. She might be small but she can scale bushes and clear a 3m high fence with ease - even with clipped wings! We love her to bits and are so pleased we bought her.


           A really lovely chicken

- Kate, 30 March 2012

We had some gold campines and one silver campine and sadly lost one gold and the silver to the fox, hence why I'm on here trying to find if any are for sale. They are very pretty chickens and very friendly. They live in a free range flock of about 5 different breeds, varying from big barred plymouth rocks down to bantam ancona and pekins. One of the gold campines got bullied at one point but that resolved itself and the others have all got on well. They roam as far as they want to over about 3 acres and I suspect this free range lifestyle probably suits them.


           Stunningly beautiful but antisocial

- Mary, 16 September 2011

I've just had to rehome my Golden Campine pullet as she beat up my Araucana 17 times per hour, flew on top of the shed, dug up the lawn, and vandalised the henhouse. She was unbelievably intelligent, strong and wild. She was a fantastic hunter and at 18 weeks could catch a wasp and eat it without getting stung. She could fly like a pigeon, would scream when caught, and was naughtier than Rod Hull's Emu. I was proud of my wonderful chicken, with her ultra-manic bird behaviour, but there was no way a personality like this could stay in my run and small garden. Maybe she was a "one-off" but if all Campines are like her, I'd only recommend them to experienced chicken keepers for show, and would keep them well away from smaller and more docile breeds. She now enjoys lots more space at a farm museum, with a Golden Campine cockerel who is just like her. (She has met her match!)


           Best in flock

- Lucy, 13 October 2010

I have a mixed flock in New Zealand, so hard to say how hardy my birds are as I live in the sub-tropical part. However, in terms of friendliness, character and general charm my Silver Campines win hands down the other breeds I have (Plymouth Barred Rock, Light Sussex, Silver Dorking Cross, Leghorn Cross, Shaver and Barnevelder.) There's something about them that makes them more interactive somehow; very talkative, very friendly (to the point of jumping on your lap whenever possible) and very smart, for a chicken. They are very inquisitive however and always the leaders of the gang trying to get into the veg patch or through the kitchen window. Great pets though and huge eggs for their size, like small goose eggs.


           Great birds

- George, 24 September 2010

My campines are attractive birds and are very friendly, they are hardy and cope well in a mixed flock.

 
 
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